Steve McDonald, Ph.D.

Professor of Sociology
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Undergraduate
Courses


JOBS & WORK (SOC 203)
Provides students with a sociological understanding of the organization of work and its implications for individual as well as societal well-being. In short, students learn how work shapes life and how life shapes work.

SOCIAL PROBLEMS (SOC 203)

Students study current social problems from a sociological perspective that emphasizes the “social” character of social problems and the role of power, politics, and history in the creation, reproduction, and amelioration of social problems.

SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (SOC 300)
Provides a broad introduction to the logic and the practice of social research. The strengths and weaknesses of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methodological strategies are explored. Students apply their knowledge of research methodology in a lab section.

QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC 429)
Provides an introduction to the sociological practice of conducting quantitative analysis of social survey data. Students develop a researchable question and answer that question through statistical analysis of data from the Add Health survey using the Stata software program.

SOCIAL CAPITAL (SOC 495)
Social capital refers to the resources embedded within interpersonal relationships. Students learn about the theory and research on social capital and discuss the impact of social capital on individual lives and communities.

ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS (SOC 708)
Explores a range of advanced techniques in statistical analysis employed in sociology. The course is "team-taught" in two 7-week modules in a given semester. I have previously taught the following topic modules:
Social Network Analysis
, Missing Data Analysis,
Causal Inference, and Computational Text Analysis.

RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC711)
Focuses on the foundational features of sociological research and their practical application through a variety of methodologies (i.e., experimentation, survey research, qualitative methods, content analysis, social network analysis, and comparative historical analysis). A lab section allows students to apply methodological techniques.

ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY (SOC 754)
Explores how economic actors, institutions, and processes are embedded in social networks and operate in distinct global, historical, and cultural contexts. The class focuses on how this embeddedness ultimately structures power and inequality in markets.
Graduate
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