Opportunites in Wet-End Chemistry
Trouble-shooting Guide for Papermaking Wet-End Chemistry

CONTENTS

  1. Alphabetical List of Links: Solving Common Problems Involving Wet-End Additives
  2. How to Use This Troubleshooting Guide
  3. Literature to help solve wet-end chemistry problems
  4. Disclaimer
  5. Some Useful Strategies for Troubleshooting

Alphabetical List of Links: Solving Common Problems Involving Wet-End Additives

Air in the Stock
Apparent Density (High, Low)
Basis Weight Variability
Breaks of the Paper Web (Dry-end, Size press, Wet-end)
Brightness (High, Low, Variable)
Color (Off-shade, Metamerism, Variable)
Curl Problems
Deposits (Inorganic, Organic, Pitch, Stickies)
Dewatering (Gravity, Vacuum, Wet-press)
Dirt Problems
Drainage (Too fast, Too slow, Variable)
Drainage Aid Programs
Dust and Lint
Entrained Air
Fluorescent Whitening Effect (High, Low, Metamerism, Variable)
Foam (Entrained air, Visible foam)
Formation uniformity (Floc, Streaks)
Friction (High, Low, Paper to metal, Paper to paper)
Holes (Pick-outs, Slime)
Metamerism (Colors, Fluorescent whitening)
Opacity (Filler light scattering, High, Low, Variable)
Periodic Problems
Pin-holes
Pitch Problems
Porosity (Too permeable, Not permeable enough)
Retention (Low,Variable,High)
Size Press Efficiency - Breaks
Size Press Starch Holdout Problems
Sizing (Acidic, AKD, ASA, Rosin, Self-sizing, Size reversion, Variable sizing)
Slime
Smoothness (High, Low)
Spots in the Paper (Dirt, Flakes, Tacky substances)
Stickies
Strength (Low: Folding endurance, Internal bond, Stiffness, Tear, Tensile)
Surface Strength
Two-sidedness (Color, Composition, Smoothness)
Variability (color, drainage, retention, strength)
Wet Strength (Low, Repulping, Variable)
Wet Web Strength


PLEASE NOTE: The information in this Guide is provided as a public service by Dr. Martin A. Hubbe of the Department of Wood and Paper Science at North Carolina State University (m_hubbe@ncsu.edu). Users of the information contained on these pages assume complete responsibility to make sure that their practices are safe and do not infringe upon an existing patent. There has been no attempt here to give full safety instructions or to make note of all relevant patents governing the use of additives. Please send corrections if you find errors or points that need better clarification.


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Information on this site is provided as a public service by Dr. Marty Hubbe of the Department of Wood and Paper Science at North Carolina State University. While the information is intended to be accurate, users of the information must accept full risk. When errors in the contents of this site are found, please send a message to the website caretaker by using the e-mail link provided below (final item):

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