About Us

Overview

The completion of the Human Genome Project has suggested that there are about 30,000 genes. However, it is thought that as many as ten million different kinds of proteins are generated from these genes and are expressed at levels that differ by over ten trillion! This is the challenge of proteomics: the study of all the proteins expressed by a given genome at a point in time. This enables us to understand the biological basis of disease, discover new diagnostic and prognostic markers, and develop new clinical tests.

Dr. Muddiman has published over 150 research articles and reviews on the fundamentals and applications of biological mass spectrometry, has presented over 170 invited lectures and his group has presented over 180 papers at national and international meetings. He has served on over 30 NIH study sections on genomics, proteomics and innovative technologies. Dr. Muddiman is currently on the advisory board of the National Science Foundation FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Editorial Boards of Mass Spectrometry Reviews, Journal of Proteome Research, Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, and Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry. Dr. Muddiman received the 1999 American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award, was the recipient of the 2004 Arthur F. Findeis Award, American Chemical Society, was Elected to the Board of Directors of the United States Human Proteome Organization in 2009, received the NCSU Alumni Association Outstanding Research Award in 2009, and was Appointed Chair of the 2011 United States Human Proteome Organization Meeting to be held in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The ultimate goals of our work are to help clinicians better understand and treat individuals with a wide range of diseases and to develop validated clinical tests. Our program requires a significant level of interaction with clinicians, basic scientists, biostatisticians as well as maintaining a large interdisciplinary group of scientists within our group including advanced separations, state-of-the-art mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics. Collectively, the environment at North Carolina State University in concert with strategic collaborations with the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, puts our program on the cutting edge of basic and applied proteomics research.

About Dr. Muddiman

The founder and director of the W.M. Keck FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Laboratory and Professor of Chemistry is Dr. David Muddiman, a bioanalytical chemist and recognized expert in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

Dr. Muddiman has published over 95 research articles and reviews on the fundamentals and applications of biological mass spectrometry, has presented over 125 invited lectures and his group has presented over 90 papers at national meetings. He has served on over 30 NIH study sections on genomics and proteomics and currently a permanent member of the Enabling Bioanalytical Technologies Study Section. Dr. Muddiman is currently on the advisory board of the National Science Foundation FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Editorial Boards of Mass Spectrometry Reviews, Journal of Proteome Research, Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, and Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry. Dr. Muddiman received the 1999 American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award and was the recipient of the 2004 Arthur F. Findeis Award, American Chemical Society.

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