Annie Antón's Research Proposal Abstracts

 

Last Modified: 18 February 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:        Towards Object-Oriented Rapid Prototyping and Automated Code Generation
Source:      BellSouth Telecommunications, Atlanta, GA
Duration:    January 2000 - January 2001
Amount:      $ 75,000
Principal Investigator:  Annie I. Antón
Graduate Research Assistant:  Thomas A. Alspaugh

Abstract:
The objective of this research is to compare and contrast two object-oriented software 
development approaches:  software development via elaboration and software development 
via translation.  Our investigations will compare the pros and cons of these methods and 
all findings will be demonstrated through non-trivial examples involving telephony features 
and services [AP99].  Additionally, we expect to be able to show how the adoption of 
certain tools and approaches can lead to more rapid prototyping and automatic code generation.


Title:         Service Requirements for Process Improvement (Phase I + II)
Source:     BellSouth Telecommunications, Atlanta, GA
Duration:   August 1999 - June 2000
Amount:     $ 30,000
Principal Investigator:  Annie I. Antón
Graduate Research Assistant:  Devon F. Siege

Abstract:


Title:         Identification and Prioritization of Business Rules
Source:     GTE Data Services, Tampa, FL
Duration:   October 1997 - February 1998
Amount:     $ 7,000
Principal Investigator:  Annie I. Antón

Title:        USF Economic Development Matching Grant:
                 Identification and Prioritization of Business Rules 
Source:    University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Duration:  January 1998 - June 1998
Amount:    $ 7,000
Principal Investigator:  Annie I. Antón
Graduate Research Assistant:  Cheryl Peterson

Proposals Currently Under Review:

Title:          CAREER: Towards Estimating Requirements Coverage:  
                   Managing Goals and Scenarios During Requirements Evolution
Source:     National Science Foundation (NSF)
Submitted: July 19, 1999
Duration:    June 2000 - June 2004
Amount:      $ 220,000
Principal Investigator:  Annie I. Antón

Abstract:
This proposal focuses on the principal investigator's efforts to integrate core research 
and educational objectives.  The research addresses important issues in the discovery, 
elaboration and management of system use scenarios for the specification of software 
requirements.  The ultimate goal is to develop viable solutions for supporting the early 
stages of the software lifecycle by ensuring requirements coverage. The objective is to 
produce a framework, and web-based tool support, to enable the evaluation of requirements 
activities and processes during scenario management and evolution as well as requirements 
coverage estimation. The web-based tool will serve as an experimental research engine, 
collecting data on requirements engineering activities in a series of projects for real 
clients in various domains, sites and project teams.  

The educational component is closely related to the research plan.  Students, at the 
undergraduate and graduate level, as well as industrial participants, will use the software 
produced during the research activities. The results of this research are expected to 
improve the outcome of projects that employ goal and scenario-based approaches during 
requirements specification.  A library of projects in various domains will lead to new 
materials such as techniques, methods and cases for software engineering education.




Title:         ITR/SW:  Investigating Research Issues in Security & Privacy:
                  Using Goals and Scenarios in the Design of Electronic Commerce Applications
Source:     NSF Information Technology Research Program (Software)
Submitted: February 10, 2000
Duration:    October 2000 - September 2003
Amount:      $ 387,606
Principal Investigators:  Annie I. Antón and Julia B. Earp (NCSU College of Management)

Abstract:
Requirements engineering is the principled application of proven methods and tools to 
describe the behavior and constraints of a proposed system.  Until recently, 
requirements engineering research was driven by organizations concerned with large 
one-of-a-kind systems.  Clearly, we cannot continue to use requirements engineering 
simply as a contractual activity resulting in a precise statement of the system to be built.  
The inclination to use more off-the-shelf software, the shortening of product cycles 
and system downsizing have reduced the number of systems that fit the traditional 
contractual model.  Since this model of requirements no longer appears to be relevant to 
software developers, there is much room for continued research in the area of 
requirements with a new focus on evolving systems. While the Internet serves as a 
virtual marketplace that is dramatically changing the way business is conducted, security 
and privacy issues are of deeper concern than ever before.  The evolutionary nature of 
electronic commerce systems, highlights the need for conceptual support for requirements 
discovery, elaboration and validation.  Moreover, there is great need for mechanisms to 
provide practitioners with more formal approaches for determining and assessing the 
security and privacy needs of electronic commerce systems. 

The research plan outlined in this proposal focuses on the investigators' efforts to 
integrate core research and educational objectives.  The research project addresses a 
number of important issues in the design and evolution of electronic commerce systems.  
The ultimate goal of the proposed work is to demonstrate viable solutions for supporting 
the early stages of the software lifecycle, specifically addressing the need for novel 
approaches to ensure security and privacy requirements coverage. 

The expected results of this research will provide increased visibility into the tasks 
and process of requirements engineering for evolutionary systems in which policy 
considerations play a major role.   Students, at the undergraduate and graduate level, 
as well as industrial participants, will employ goals and scenarios throughout the design of 
electronic commerce systems. A research engine will be used to collect data across various 
projects with a unique focus on security policy and privacy policy development and their 
operationalization into system requirements.  Practitioners will benefit from stronger 
guidelines and tools for ensuring requirements coverage as well as from a library of reusable 
goal classes for software systemsin which security and privacy are paramount.  The 
educational objectives include the development of multidisciplinary systems design 
experiences for students in the form of an undergraduate level project studio specializing 
in the analysis and design of state of the art electronic commerce systems.




Title:          ITR/SOC:  Value Mining: Surfacing the Subliminal Values in Information Technology
Source:      NSF Information Technology Research Program (Social Impacts)
Submitted: February 12, 2000
Duration:    October 2000 - September 2003
Amount:      $ 411,567
Principal Investigators:  Colin Potts (Georgia Tech) and Annie I. Antón

Abstract:
New information appliances merge communication features with computing. As a result, 
societal values such as those regarding interruptibility, privacy, the separation of home from 
work, and the coordination and negotiation of commitments are changing rapidly.  The technologies 
influencing these changes are artificial, not natural phenomena, resulting from many conscious 
decisions made from diverse perspectives. Nevertheless, the emergent net effect of all these 
interests and decisions includes subtle and inadvertent consequences [Bro97], so that technologies 
such as e-mail and mobile telephony seem to have a life of their own [Kli96, Mar94], making subliminal 
demands on users to adapt their thoughts and actions. Those who design new communication 
technologies need to understand how development and use affect and transform societal values as 
well as the influences of values on their use and development. The proposed research will investigate 
the degree to which features and their use are subject to a variety of influences such as the 
conscious decisions that information technology users make about which features they use and 
how they use them. 

The research plan in this proposal will lead to a feature assessment instrument that will help 
"mine" existing and proposed technologies for their unforeseen effects on personal coordination. 
Specifically, the research focuses on features and the values they afford to individuals; these 
values are realized each time a user makes a conscious decision based on the capabilities a feature 
provides and the responsibilities it imposes. The research project addresses and investigates the 
differences in coordination technology (telephony-based, e-mail-based, and integrated), the 
centrality of the values to particular features (core values versus peripheral), and the user's 
autonomy [Rul94] in feature use.