Precepts from Popeís Essay on Criticism

1.††††† One science only will one genius fit ††††† 1.60

2.††††† First follow Nature††††††††††††††††††††††††† 1.69

3. †††† Wit and judgment often are at strife††††† 1.82

4. †††† Criticism the Museís handmaid†††††††††††††† 1.102

5. †††† Know well each ancientís proper character†††† 1.119

6.††††† Music resembles poetry†††††††††††††††††††††††††† 1.143

II

7. †††† Drink deep or taste not††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 2.16

8. †††† read each work of wit/with the same spirit that its author writ 2.33-4

9.††††† survey the whole, nor seek slight faults to find††††††† 2.35-6

10.††† regard the writerís end /Since none can compass more than they intend†† 2.55-6

11.††† critics of less judgment . . . offend. . . by a love to parts 2.88

12†††† words are like leaves; and where they most abound/ Much fruit of sense is beneath is rarely found†††††††† 2.110

13.††† different styles with different subjects sort†††† 2.122

14. †† words . . . fantastic if too new or old††††† 2.134

15.True ease in writing comes from Art, not Chance††† 2.162

16.††† Avoid extremes2.185

17.††† [avoid] the notion of the town††††† 2.209

18. †† some judge Ö of names not works†††††††† 2.212

19.††† worst isÖ a constant critic at the great manís board†††††††† 2.214

20. †† [be] first true merit to befriend†††† 2.274

21.††† Nor in the critic let the man be lost††††††† 2.323

22. †† No pardon [for] vile obscenity†††††† 2.330

23. †† These monsters, Critics . . . engage†††††††† 2.354

III

24†††† Let truth and candor shine†† 3.4

25.††† Be silent when you doubt your sense 3.7

26.††† Own your errors

27.††† Nor be so civil as to prove unjust3.22

28.††† Tis best sometimes your censure to restrain 3.37

29.††† [donít be a] bookful blockhead†††† 3.53

30.††† Popeís portrait of the ideal critic 3.73-83†††††††