English 669: Methods and the Profession
Assignment 3
Dr. Morillo

Assignment 3: Writing Abstracts

 

Due the Start of Class, Monday, September 18

3 copies: 1 as file emailed to me; 2 printed out


One of the genres with which you will become increasingly familiar as you engage in academic scholarship is the conference paper abstract.  Abstracts can range from only 200 words up to 500, with 300 quite common. Being able to write a good one is the key to getting into conferences where you can read your work and hear the work of your peers. For most MAs, the conference paper abstract is the genre most important to their professional development.

Your Writing Assignment. 
You will write one 300-word abstract of your own work. Single-spaced text. Fits on one page. The 300-word limit will be strictly enforced via the word count function.

You will bring 2 printed on paper copies of the abstract to class: one for you, one for your peer reviewer. To me, however, you will send by email attachment a file copy of your abstract, due by class time. You and your peer will then discuss how to revise and improve your abstracts. I want this as file so I can 1) run word count on it 2) make an html copy of the best one(s) to post for the class.

You must turn it in on time and make it 300 words or fewer to pass.

What are you abstracting?

Take any argumentative paper you have written, or the idea for any paper you are planning to write, and develop an abstract from that paper. Learning to abstract the argument of a longer paper is a very good way for you to gain a clearer perspective about what youíve really done in a paper, what your chief concerns, methods, and points are.  The abstract also prepares you for writing the genre that is the key to professionalization at the MA level and beyond. By learning to write good abstracts you have the best chance of getting your work accepted at conferences. Being able to abstract work will help you condense longer research papers you may have written or will write into the shorter form of 10-12 pages that can be read in the 20 minutes presenters are typically allotted at conferences.

 

You may wish to consult the general (not just for English) guidelines from Columbia College for examples and hints see Writing an Academic Abstract Note that these are not limited to abstracts of work in the humanities. In prior years, several strong abstracts from this assignment have gotten NCSU MA students' work accepted at conferences.


 

To familiarize yourself with the look and lingo of the Call for Papers genre, to which the abstract is a response, here are some current Call For Papers (CFPs) entries for a graduate and professional conferences this fall asking for 300-wd abstracts. From the U Penn CFP site

Adolescence in Film and Television (March 28-31, 2018; Proposals due October 1, 2017)

updated: 

Monday, August 7, 2017 - 9:35am

Popular Culture and American Culture Association

deadline for submissions: 

Sunday, October 1, 2017

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 28-31, 2018 in Indianapolis. The official deadline for online submission of presentation abstracts (see below for additional information) is October 1, 2017.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels. 

deadline for submissions: 

October 1, 2017

full name / name of organization: 

Popular Culture and American Culture Association

contact email: 

k.hart@tcu.edu

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 28-31, 2018 in Indianapolis. The official deadline for online submission of presentation abstracts (see below for additional information) is October 1, 2017.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels. 

Possible topics of relevance include, but are certainly not limited to, advertising images and appeals, coming-of-age narratives, drug use, HIV/AIDS, juvenile delinquency, nerd culture, non-heterosexuality, otherness, premarital sex, product placement, queerness (broadly defined), violence and social aggression, and (losing oneís) virginity.

Interested individuals are asked to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words (including presentation title). Submit your abstract online at https://conference.pcaaca.org/ (and be certain to select the ďAdolescence in Film and TelevisionĒ subject area when doing so).

Decisions pertaining to the status of submitted abstracts will be communicated within two weeks of receipt. If you have questions of any kind prior to submitting your abstract, please contact Kylo-Patrick Hart, the Adolescence in Film and Television Area chair, by e-mail (k.hart@tcu.edu).

 

 

 

New Approaches to Teaching Fitzgerald

updated: 

Friday, August 4, 2017 - 2:28pm

Northeast Modern Language Association

deadline for submissions: 

Saturday, September 30, 2017

This pedagogical roundtable welcomes proposals that offer innovations for teaching Fitzgerald's many works. How does his literature speak to the Jazz Age and major moments in United States and global history? How can works such as The Great Gatsby clarify studies of ecology, urban environments, photography, and other topics? Proposals that consider the authorís lesser researched works are encouraged.

Submit 300-word abstracts by September 30th with a free account at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17003.

deadline for submissions: 

September 30, 2017

full name / name of organization: 

Northeast Modern Language Association

contact email: 

derekmcg@buffalo.edu

This pedagogical roundtable welcomes proposals that offer innovations for teaching Fitzgerald's many works. How does his literature speak to the Jazz Age and major moments in United States and global history? How can works such as The Great Gatsby clarify studies of ecology, urban environments, photography, and other topics? Proposals that consider the authorís lesser researched works are encouraged.

Submit 300-word abstracts by September 30th with a free account at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17003.

This session coincides with the Northeast Modern Language Association opening address with Stewart O'Nan, author of the Fitzgerald biofiction West of Sunset (2015). For more information about the opportunity to interview O'Nan for potential publication, please apply here before September 30: www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/initiatives/NeMLAReads.html