Richard M. Felder and Ronald W. Rousseau
Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes

The top selling introductory chemical engineering textbook in the United States almost since it first appeared in 1978. The 2005 Update Edition of EPCP contains hundreds of problems, including problems designed to be solved using spreadsheets and symbolic mathematics programs. The text comes with a CD-ROM that includes interactive tutorials, a student-friendly equation-solving program, an on-line physical property database, and a visual encyclopedia of chemical engineering equipment, as well as a workbook that guides students through the solutions of selected chapter-end problems. A review of the third edition appeared in Chemical Engineering Education.

Message to instructors from Richard Felder and Ronald Rousseau  

Errata: 2005 Update Edition, Printings 4 and higher. Last updated 11/17/13. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: 2005 Update Edition, Printings 1-3. Last updated 11/17/13. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: Student Workbook for 2005 Update Edition. Last updated 11/8/10. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: 3rd Edition, Printings 5-11. Last updated 6/14/11. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: 3rd Edition, Printing 4. Last updated 6/14/11. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: 3rd Edition, Printings 1-3. Last updated 6/14/11. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Errata: Instructor's manual.

Errata: Interactive Chemical Process Principles. Last updated 11/16/05. List of corrections to the courseware that comes with the text. Please e-mail new corrections as ASCII text files or Word attachments to rmfelder@mindspring.com.

Publisher's page. Features of the text, information about ordering.

Illustrative course web site. A home page from an offering of the material and energy balance course at N.C. State University containing links to the course syllabus, policies and procedures, class handouts, study guides for exams, and old exams.

"Stoichiometry Without Tears". An article from Chemical Engineering Education offering suggestions for using active learning to teach the stoichiometry course.

"A Student-Centered Approach to Teaching Material and Energy Balances." A two-part series in Chemical Engineering Education written by Lisa Bullard and Richard Felder on an implementation of the stoichiometry course that made extensive use of active and cooperative methods. Part 1. Course Design describes the course structure and policies, assignments, and teaching assistant preparation, and Part 2. Course Delivery and Assessment outlines the first week of the course, how active, cooperative, and inquiry-based learning and instructional technology were used, and how the course was assessed and evaluated.

"Knowledge Structure of the Stoichiometry Course." Annotated concept maps for the content of the standard stoichiometry course.

Handouts for students. Tips on maintaining confidence, taking tests, and identifying and taking advantage of learning resources on campus.

"Index of Learning Styles." A self-scoring instrument that allows students (and instructors) to determine their learning style preferences. After taking the test, users can obtain information about the strengths of their learning styles and suggestions for how to get more out of their courses.

Richard Felder's home page. Links to Dr. Felder's education-related papers, columns in Chemical Engineering Education, handouts for students, and information about workshops.


Message to instructors from Richard Felder and Ronald Rousseau

Dear Colleague,

We are grateful to our many colleagues who have adopted Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes since it came out in 1978, and our commitment to maintaining its quality--including maintaining this page of resources for instructors--remains steadfast. There are two phenomena, however, that work against the book being as effective as it can be. We are asking for your help in dealing with them.

  • Please do not post solutions from the Instructor's Manual, especially on Web sites with public access.

    If fully worked-out solutions are posted, you can be sure they'll come back at you in future semesters when you assign the same problem, especially from members of student organizations with complete files of old tests and solutions to tests and homework problems. Moreover, the solutions will soon be in circulation throughout the country as students download them and e-mail them to friends at other colleges. Giving students outlines of solutions and making them responsible for filling in the details is much more instructive than handing them complete solutions, which effectively removes all incentive to think any more about problems they missed.

  • Please do not encourage students to buy used or imported texts.

    We know how much texts cost and are sympathetic to students trying to economize on them. You should know, however, that when students buy used texts or texts that booksellers purchase overseas at highly discounted rates and then resell, the bookstores and resellers make nice profits but the authors and publishers get nothing. This drives up textbook prices, makes the critical and monumental task of writing undergraduate textbooks a relatively unrewarded one, and discourages potential authors from writing them. You may not be able to stop all of your students from buying resold texts, but please don't encourage them. Many thanks.

    Sincerely,
    Rich Felder and Ron Rousseau

    Return to top of page.